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You are here: Home » GreenFaith in the Media » Press Clips » Parsippany workshop shows how to build a rain barrel to conserve water

Parsippany workshop shows how to build a rain barrel to conserve water

North Jersey.com

Saint Gregory's Episcopal Church in Parsippany holds a rain barrel workshop as part of their Water Shield and Certification Program efforts

Parsippany workshop shows how to build a rain barrel to conserve water

Kathy Haake, from the Environmental Commission of Rockaway Borough, building a rain barrel at the workshop in Parsippany.

 

The Whippany River Watershed Action Committee and Saint Gregory's Episcopal Church conducted a rain barrel workshop at the church on Saturday, May 3.

All attendees built their own 55-gallon rain barrel using supplies and tools provided by the Rutgers Water Resource Program.

Kathy Haake, from the Environmental Commission of Rockaway Borough, building a rain barrel at the workshop in Parsippany.Anjali Joshi, of Parsippany, works on her rain barrel.

A representative from the Rutgers Cooperative Extension showed participants, step by step, how to build a rain barrel and how to install it at home.

A rain barrel is placed under a gutter's downspout next to a house, shed or other outdoor structure to collect rain water from the roof. It harvests rain water to use for gardening or watering a lawn and other uses, as opposed to utilizing drinking water, helps to replenish groundwater supplies by diverting roof runoff to a pervious surface, such as a lawn or garden, by way of the overflow on the rain barrel.

Harvesting rain water in a rain barrel also reduces the potential for stormwater to deliver pollution to local waterways. Stormwater is created when rainwater runs off hard surfaces like rooftops, roadways, parking lots and compacted lawns, carrying with it pollution to the storm drain system which is then discharged directly in to rivers and streams

 

 

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